Alternatively, you can attack the problem by propagating trust from a seed set of trustworthy sites (e.g., cnn.com, mit.edu, etc.). This approach is called TrustRank, and it has been implemented by SEOmoz in the form of their mozTrust metric. Sites with a higher mozTrust value are located closer to trustworthy sites in the link graph and therefore considered more trusted.
Just because a phrase didn’t appear in either of these tools doesn’t mean there is no demand for it. There are other ways to confirm that someone is interested in this topic. And for the blog posts and articles that target the informational keyphrases, we aren’t necessarily looking for huge demand. Any visibility in search can make a big difference in the performance of a post.
Blogs have many benefits for content marketing too. Do you need a blog for your organization? It all depends but there are many befits and reasons to at least have a corporate blog (which doesn’t mean it should be company-centric). Blogs have many inherent benefits, can serve multiple (content) marketing goals and there are dozens of good arguments to get started.
Indirect competitors are the ones who offers a similar set of features but to a different customer segment; or, they target your exact customer base without offering the exact same set of features, which means indirect competitors are solving the same problem but for a different customer base, or are solving the same problem but offer a different solution.
One thing you'll need to know right from the get-go is that none of these benefits is going to show up immediately. Content marketing is a wonderful example of what's referred to as flywheel marketing: At first, it takes quite a bit of effort just to get the wheel turning. Over time, though, the wheel's own momentum lessens the effort required of you to see the same results. Don't expect results tomorrow, and think now about whose expectations you may need to temper, and what that'll mean for your work. But don't let that fool you into thinking it isn't working.
The number of ways in which content benefits SEO is far too great to count here. In summary, great content attracts editorial links, which tell Google you're important and authoritative. Google can also crawl your content, getting a far better idea of what your company is about, allowing it to return your site for more relevant queries (including a great many long-tail queries). The list goes on, but it can all be boiled down to this: Without content, what is there to optimize for search engines?
Across the top of the paper, list the main features and characteristics of each product or service. Include such things as target market, price, size, method of distribution, and extent of customer service for a product. For a service, list prospective buyers, where the service is available, price, website, toll-free phone number, and other features that are relevant. A glance at the competition grid will help you see where your product fits in the overall market.
Suggestions for improved page speed range from backend alterations like eliminating JavaScript and CSS in above-the-fold elements to simple image compression. If you’re looking for quick and effective page speed improvement, image compression is your best bet. Run each image listed in the report through a simple image compressor like this one, then re-upload them to your CMS. Depending on the before-and-after sizes of your images, you stand to gain a substantial increase in performance.
When businesses pursue content marketing, the main focus should be the needs of the prospect or customer. Once a business has identified the customer's need, information can be presented in a variety of formats, including news, video, white papers, e-books, infographics, email newsletters, case studies, podcasts, how-to guides, question and answer articles, photos, blogs, etc.[5][6] Most of these formats belong to the digital channel.
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