On-page SEO refers to best practices that web content creators and site owners can follow to ensure their content is as easily discoverable as possible. This includes the creation of detailed page metadata (data about data) for each page and elements such as images, the use of unique, static URLs, the inclusion of keywords in relevant headings and subheadings, and the use of clean HTML code, to name a few.
Search engine optimization (SEO) is often about making small modifications to parts of your website. When viewed individually, these changes might seem like incremental improvements, but when combined with other optimizations, they could have a noticeable impact on your site's user experience and performance in organic search results. You're likely already familiar with many of the topics in this guide, because they're essential ingredients for any web page, but you may not be making the most out of them.

Use Local Searches to Your Advantage. By default, Google Adwords will set your campaign live nationally. If you are a local merchant, if you ship to a specific area, or provide service (only) to a specific geographic location, it is a best practice to customize your Location Targeting in Google Adwords. Get to Know Your Account Language. Google Adwords provides options specific to language targeting, ad scheduling, devices. As a best practice, always click into the Settings of each campaign to verify your campaign is set up properly.

Link text is the visible text inside a link. This text tells users and Google something about the page you're linking to. Links on your page may be internal—pointing to other pages on your site—or external—leading to content on other sites. In either of these cases, the better your anchor text is, the easier it is for users to navigate and for Google to understand what the page you're linking to is about.


When returning results on a SERP, search engines factor in the “relevance” and “authority” of each website to determine which sites are the most helpful and useful for the searcher. In an attempt to provide the most relevant results, the exact same search by different users may result in different SERPs, depending on the type of query. SERPs are tailored specifically for each user based their unique browsing history, location, social media activity and more.
PPC stands for “pay-per-click”. PPC advertising platforms allow you to create content, show it to relevant users and then charge you for specific actions taken on the ad. In many cases, you’ll be paying for ad clicks that take users to your site, but on some platforms you can also pay for other actions like impressions, video views and on-site engagements.
The Google PageRank Checker on Small SEO Tools offers advanced insight not commonly found with any other free Google PageRank Checker or PR checker. The red results let you know when a Page Rank is fake, or false. You see, some shady individuals will use a variety of methods to create a “spoof" Page Rank. You can use this tool to check the validity of a website before you buy it, or buy advertising, and save yourself from getting scammed. In a nutshell, most tools will show you just a Page Rank and you could still be suckered into wasting your money on a scam. However, Small SEO Tools offers you a Google pagerank checker that provides you with a color scheme to identify the Fake PR from True PR, offering you peace of mind.
Page and Brin's theory is that the most important pages on the Internet are the pages with the most links leading to them. PageRank thinks of links as votes, where a page linking to another page is casting a vote. The idea comes from academia, where citation counts are used to find the importance of researchers and research. The more often a particular paper is cited by other papers, the more important that paper is deemed. 
Advertisers pay for each single click they receive, with the actual amount paid based on the amount of bid. It is common practice amongst auction hosts to charge a winning bidder just slightly more (e.g. one penny) than the next highest bidder or the actual amount bid, whichever is lower.[8] This avoids situations where bidders are constantly adjusting their bids by very small amounts to see if they can still win the auction while paying just a little bit less per click.
A search engine results page, or SERP, is the web page that appears in a browser window when a keyword query is put into a search field on a search engine page. The list of results generally includes a list of links to pages that are ranked from the most popular to the least popular from the number of hits for the particular keyword. The list will include not only the links, but also a short description of each page, and of course, the titles of the webpage. The term “search engine results page” may refer to a single page of links returned by a query or the entire set of links returned.
Paid Search, the lead and traffic generation medium has become a cornerstone for billion-dollar organizations and has remained virtually unchanged. Some may argue that “unchanged” isn’t necessarily the right description based on industry and tactic changes — such as the introduction of Quality Score, the Bing/Yahoo deal, Enhanced Campaigns, etc. — however, one thing that has not changed in paid search is what comprises its campaign: keywords, ad text and landing pages.
Sometimes, you can find keyword ‘niches’ for which the top bid is a fantastic deal. These are longer, highly specific phrases, that not everyone will have taken the time to pursue; “long-tail search terms”. In this case, PPC is a great option because you can generate highly targeted traffic to your site for a fraction of the cost of any other form of paid advertising.
PageRank is a link analysis algorithm and it assigns a numerical weighting to each element of a hyperlinked set of documents, such as the World Wide Web, with the purpose of "measuring" its relative importance within the set. The algorithm may be applied to any collection of entities with reciprocal quotations and references. The numerical weight that it assigns to any given element E is referred to as the PageRank of E and denoted by {\displaystyle PR(E).} Other factors like Author Rank can contribute to the importance of an entity.
SEO is the process of editing website code and content to build authority and relevancy for keywords for the purpose of increasing the amount of organic search engine traffic (Google, Bing, Yahoo!, etc.) to your website. SEO is what helps search engines find your site in the vast sea of the Internet. This is why SEO Inc, a SEO marketing company, works closely with you to develop custom campaigns for businesses of all sizes.
Featured Snippet – Search results that appear at the top of the SERPs, just below the ads, are called Featured Snippets. Unlike other results, Featured Snippets highlight a significant portion of the content. That way, users can get the info they’re looking for without even clicking a link. That’s why Featured Snippets are sometimes called Answer Boxes. Marketers like it when their websites land in the Featured Snippet spot because Google users will often click the link to get a more detailed answer beyond what’s provided in the snippet.
3. Have a discerning eye: learn from every landing page you visit. This applies to your casual surfing, online shopping, research and competitive analysis. After you’ve clicked on a paid ad, take a few extra seconds to observe the landing page and try to pick it apart. What works well on the landing page? What doesn’t? Take these observations and try to apply it to your site. It just might give you an edge over your competitors!
The majority of web traffic is driven by the major commercial search engines, Google, Bing, and Yahoo!. Although social media and other types of traffic can generate visits to your website, search engines are the primary method of navigation for most Internet users. This is true whether your site provides content, services, products, information, or just about anything else.
To maximize success and achieve scale, automated bid management systems can be deployed. These systems can be used directly by the advertiser, though they are more commonly used by advertising agencies that offer PPC bid management as a service. These tools generally allow for bid management at scale, with thousands or even millions of PPC bids controlled by a highly automated system. The system generally sets each bid based on the goal that has been set for it, such as maximize profit, maximize traffic, get the very targeted customer at break even, and so forth. The system is usually tied into the advertiser's website and fed the results of each click, which then allows it to set bids. The effectiveness of these systems is directly related to the quality and quantity of the performance data that they have to work with — low-traffic ads can lead to a scarcity of data problem that renders many bid management tools useless at worst, or inefficient at best.

To cease opportunity, the firm should summarize their current customers' personas and purchase journey from this they are able to deduce their digital marketing capability. This means they need to form a clear picture of where they are currently and how many resources they can allocate for their digital marketing strategy i.e. labour, time etc. By summarizing the purchase journey, they can also recognise gaps and growth for future marketing opportunities that will either meet objectives or propose new objectives and increase profit.


Generally speaking, “ad position” is influenced by the amount you are willing to pay (max CPC bid) and the relevancy of the ad to the keywords in your ad group (Quality Score). Quality Score is a numeric representation of the relevancy of your ads and keywords assigned independently by both Google and Bing. It is important to note that only Google’s Quality Score impacts ad position currently. Bing’s Quality Score serves only as a guideline to improve your ad/keyword relevancy. We will discuss Quality Score in further detail in Part B.
In the example above (a SERP for the search query “lawnmowers”), all of the results on the SERP – with the exception of the map and business listing beneath it – are paid results. The three large text-based ads at the top of the SERP (considered prime positioning for advertisers) are typical PPC ads. Of those three ads, the lower two (for Craftsman.com and Husqvarna.com) both feature ad extensions allowing prospective customers to navigate to specific pages on their websites directly from the ads.

Despite this many people seem to get it wrong! In particular “Chris Ridings of www.searchenginesystems.net” has written a paper entitled “PageRank Explained: Everything you’ve always wanted to know about PageRank”, pointed to by many people, that contains a fundamental mistake early on in the explanation! Unfortunately this means some of the recommendations in the paper are not quite accurate.
Simply put, search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of optimizing the content, technical set-up, and reach of your website so that your pages appear at the top of a search engine result for a specific set of keyword terms. Ultimately, the goal is to attract visitors to your website when they search for products, services, or information related to your business.

Labels are like Post-It notes and built-in documentation for campaigns, ad groups, keywords, and ads. Labels can be used for anything, from ad creation dates to top performing keywords. Labels are especially useful in accounts with multiple account managers or specific segments with varied goals. Once properly applied it is much easier to assess campaign performance for a specific initiative.


Due to the huge number of items that are available or related to the query there usually are several pages in response to a single search query as the search engine or the user's preferences restrict viewing to a subset of results per page. Each succeeding page will tend to have lower ranking or lower relevancy results. Just like the world of traditional print media and its advertising, this enables competitive pricing for page real estate, but compounded by the dynamics of consumer expectations and intent— unlike static print media where the content and the advertising on every page is the same all of the time for all viewers, despite such hard copy being localized to some degree, usually geographic, like state, metro-area, city, or neighborhoods.
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On October 17, 2002, SearchKing filed suit in the United States District Court, Western District of Oklahoma, against the search engine Google. SearchKing's claim was that Google's tactics to prevent spamdexing constituted a tortious interference with contractual relations. On May 27, 2003, the court granted Google's motion to dismiss the complaint because SearchKing "failed to state a claim upon which relief may be granted."[67][68]
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